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    » Show All     «Prev «1 ... 12 13 14 15 16     » Slide Show

    Valentine Pieratt: French Army Revolutionary War



    Valentine Pieratt clearly fought in the Revolutionary War while in the French Army.  He was in the final battle at Yorktown as a cannonier.  He applied for a pension from the U.S. Government in 1836, but was denied because he served in the French Army.  In this file, I have copies of his enlistment and discharge from the French Army and his rejection from the U.S. Government for his pension.

     

    Valentine was inducted into the French army on January 13, 1779.  He served in Rochambeau's regiment in Lauzun's Legion.  The French troops embarked upon their journey to America on April 6, 1780.  They sailed into Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island on July 11, 1780.  By November 1, 1780, Rochambeau's troops went into winter quarters.  Lauzun's Legion was dispatched to Connecticut.  [see En Avant with our French Allies by Robet Selig (page 23 & more) for a detailed history.]  Rochambeau's army was considered quite small, barely 4,800 officers and men.  The number of artillery personnel was 413, including Valentine Pieratt.

     

    In late May 1781, Rochambeau and George Washington had drawn up plans to join their forces on the Northe River for an attack on New York.   In June, Rochambeau marched his army through Connecticut towards New York.  Rochambeau later wrote, "We have covered 220 miles in eleven dayss of marching.  There are not four provinces in France where we could have traveled with more order and economy and without lacking anything. . "  Lauzun expressed similar sentiments: "The French army marched through America in perfect order and with perfect discipline, setting an example which neither the English nor the American army had ever furnished." [p. 38].  By July 6, the French forces joined up with the Continental Army near Phillpsburgh, New York.  The combined forces departed for Virginia on August 19. 

     

    September 28, 1781 began the seige of Yorktown.  By October 19, Corwallis surrendered.  The French forces spent the winter of 1781-1782 in Virginia.

     

    By the end of  October 1782, Rochambeau's infantry had crossed back into Connecticut on its march to Boston, Massachusetts.  On Nov. 11, the last French units crossed into Rhode Island.  Lauzun's Legion spent the winter in Deleware.  On April 11, 1783, there was a cessation of hostilitie following the Preliminaries of Peace. 

     

    Valentine Pieratt was discharged from the French Army on May 1, 1783 in Wilmington, Deleware.

     


     


    Linked toValentin PIERRAT
    AlbumsRevolutionary War Veteran: Valentine Pieratt 1750-1844

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